The Secret Path Book Reviews


“One of the noblest attestations to spiritual truth this century has produced.”—The Inquirer [London]

“In response to numerous requests from readers of his very successful book A Search in Secret India, the talented author here presents a fully-detailed description of the technique which he pursued in the East, a system which rewarded him with amazing spiritual experiences. He also reveals a Yoga breathing exercise safe enough to be practised without the supervision of a teacher and one which yields remarkable results. By this method it is possible for everyone to discover the discover the deathless spirit within.”—Southport Guardian [UK]

“ and through it all thre is the deep motion of the influence of the Maharshi. And he tells of that way of finding God which is in the line of the great Hindu teaching, the wonderful Upanishads. In this book the method and process of meditation and contemplation laid down is what in the West is known as The Mystic Way. But the main idea is the questing of the Overself, the pressing intensive inquiry into that identity which we feel ourselves to be.”— The Science of Thought Review

“...for those who wish to put them to the test, he has given clearly expressed instructions as to the methods to be followed to obtain the amazing spiritual experiences he describes.”—Edinburgh Evening News

“The timeliness of this book is real. It expresses, with a beautiful clarity, truths which have been too often hidden under ponderous phrase, difficult Oriental symbolism, and mystical vagueness.”—Alice Bailey, from the Foreword

“It is so utterly impossible even to suggest the nature and extent of that world with which The Secret Path and A Search in Secret India deal that we prefer to call these books to the attention of serious readers, leaving to them the thrill and the awakening which we believe they will inevitably produce.”—Advance [USA]

“...[A Search in Secret India] was a remarkable book, and in every respect its successor, The Secret Path, is also a remarkable book, being really a development of the mystic climax to the former work. It describes a system of mystic training for the West which is based on Yoga...”— Sheffield Daily Telegraph

“The Secret Path is written by one who has a thorough knowledge of his subject and the ability to express this knowledge clearly and concisely. The book has a message for members of all religious denominations and is a splendid book to own, or to give to a friend.”—The National Spiritualist [Chicago] Dec. 1, 1935

“If you know nothing of the mystic science of the soul, this book will enthrall you. If you are already a student of Yoga, its methods and practices, I can recommend this volume to you.”—The Two Worlds [Manchester]

“...displays that tenderness and delicacy and an instinctive reverence for his subject which distinguish this author and is also an extremely practical guide to unfolding the mysterious powers of the Overself which lie dormant in each one of us. It is truly an inspiring book.”— The Indian Literary Review [Bombay]

“The Secret Path is not to be considered 'just another book on Yoga.' It is far superior to the recent flood of publications appearing on this subject. The style is simple, straightforward and pleasing—technical and abstruse terms have been omitted.”—The American Theosophist, 1936

“There is an Emersonian ring about Brunton's words that appeals to the practical Westerner more than the phraseology of traditional Christian mysticism could ever do, but the methods he advises are learned from the East. The book is informed with an exalted, albeit practical, wisdom that makes it one of the noblest attestations to Spiritual Truth this century has produced.”—Inquirer: Incorporating the Christian Life and Unitarian Herald

“The growing desire of humanity to know more about manifest in the demand for these two books [A Search in Secret India & The Secret Path] written by Paul Brunton....An absorbing book, the mere reading of which carries you away into unrealized regions of peace and contentment.”—The Nottingham Journal

“This is a study of the wisdom of the East regarding the art of life; how to attain complete self-control, inner peace of mind, tranquility and happiness; and without retiring from the world.”—Scribner's Magazine [New York]

“ in striking fashion with the regular practice of mystical concentration and meditation, suited to Western minds as a means of attaining true self-knowledge and penetrating the mysteries of the 'Overself.'”—The Natal Mercury

“...that pleasure [of reading A Search in Secret India] was as nothing in comparison with the joy of finding authentic spiritual inspiration in...The Secret just what its subtitle indicates it to be, 'a technique of spiritual self-discovery for the modern world.'”— The London Forum

“What is really admirable in the author is his strong common sense and fine power of observation and expression. The book is an achievement in that it has beautifully expressed what true spirituality is and has shown a practical path to the busy West.”—Prabuddha Bharata [Calcutta] Sept. 1935

“ is a book which should prove a source of inspiration to many and...might be read with profit by a follower of any religion—or of none! ….gives a truer, more useful and safer account of yoga than many far more pretentious treatises.”—Sri Krishna Prem for The Aryan Path [Bombay] May 1935

“Mr. Brunton lays down a simple but effective system for the beginner for the ultimate unfolding of the inner self....He tells it all in such a straightforward and easily assimilable fashion that The Secret Path might well be used as a textbook for this particular phase of schooling in mystic philosophy and practice.”—The Friend [Johannesburg]

“Another illuminating book from the pen of the English journalist who sought the Indian wisdom to find that spiritual release which he describes so movingly in this present volume as the 'secret path' all men must someday tread. Spiritual techniques are given and their efficacy inspiringly discussed.”— Inner Culture

“There is no doubt that the East has something of value to offer the West in exchange for our science, and that something is Yoga. The practice of Yoga as outlined by Mr. Brunton, makes no demands on credulity. It offers itself as a purely pragmatic enterprise, an experiment which is certain to work if the requisite conditions are met.”—The Review of Religion [USA]

Amazon reader reviews for The Secret Path (UK):

“Written in 1934 it is probably more relevant today than it was when it was first published. The book discusses the nature of man and his soul without being overly religious or psychoanalytic. Paul Brunton provides a series of practical mental exercises and guidance, which are described in successive chapters. What for? The answer is simply that the exercises are designed to help the reader to answer the most difficult question that a person can pose to himself—"Who am I?". There are no answers from Paul, but he does give some interesting insights into how difficult it is to find the answer for yourself. If you have ever wondered what life is all about, if you are interested in who you really are or if you have ever asked what a "soul" is, then this book is probably in the right ball park for you.”

“This is an excellent book which I am very glad to have purchased after stumbling across various references to Paul Brunton whilst browsing for articles on meditation, controlling the ego etc. Although the language is a little old fashioned I found the descriptive phraseology extremely satisfying to read. It added a great deal to my enjoyment of the book. The ideas presented are, however, very accessible and totally relevant to today's society—perhaps even more so than when they were written. All in all a book that I would heartily recommend to all fans of the books of Eckhart Tolle and for people looking for practical advice in this area of self improvement.”

“I became a fan of Mr Brunton after reading about the time he spent with Ramana Maharishi. He is a great writer...and his books are brilliant—some of them quite difficult to get through...Secret Path is a good read.”